You blog, therefore you risk

Do you admire people in the media field?

Friends of mine have expressed from time to time that they felt I was pretty lucky to be in this industry.

And to their credit, they are sort of right. There are a some perks. People know what you do and they try to stay on your good side because they know publicity can be power. You get to meet people you may not have and do things that you may not have been able to otherwise. On bored, rainy or lazy Sundays you know that when you Google yourself, you will be on at least the first six pages. But that fact right there is the rub. Your name is out there. You stay somewhat exposed. And obviously by my writing this blog, I’m not really dodging the exposure factor. There is just something freeing about sharing your beeswax. Is it just me? Is it better to go into hiding?

I never really was the one to be a shrinking violet. Expression, to me, is a virtue. Way above patience though I think people who know me will say I need to switch the two.

So what do you do when you are a part of an industry with bylines but you want to put yourself out there in some other avenue that isn’t work-related? This is what I’ve mapped out so far and some of these are probably going to be self-explanatory as well as the fact that I’m only just now testing my theory. I may very well be slicing my own throat.

1.) Don’t name names. Hey, you’re going to probably be found out (even with a pen name, nothing is sacred anymore) at some point so don’t make it worse by giving people hints about who you are talking about. Don’t describe exact characteristics and don’t get into physical detail.

2.) Don’t give numbers, discuss circulation or share the intimate details of what can be conceived as the corporate pitfalls of your place of business. Though this WIRED article given out to my team by my boss may steer you differently on this subject.

3.) Don’t dis your company. Save that for anonymous myspace profiles.

4.) Use humor and some tack. You can still share you funny stories, talk about your experiences and what not, but don’t get carried away in profanity, threats and general remarks about just what exactly you may want to do to so and so in the office — or worse, your boss.

5.) Cross your fingers and hope if you get caught, your company has a sense of humor.

We’ll see. According to this article, I’m already breaking the rules.

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